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It’s Winter – How to find places and where to go to get photos of nature right now.

There are several ways to find beautiful places and where you can go to get photos of nature in the wintertime. Here are some ways to find a few locations:


1. Research online: use search engines such as Google, Google Maps, local photography Facebook Groups and other photography websites to find popular winter photography locations near your home. Check for reviews and photos from other photographers who have visited the same place. I simply Googled “where around me can I go to take nature photos?” and so many places and sites came up. You’ll have to be diligent to sort through the list and determine the best place to go!


2. Ask the local community: ask people in your local community, such as friends, family, or coworkers, if they know of any ideal locations that are close by. They may have some hidden gems that are not well known. Or your own backyard may serve as an excellent place for some captures after some fresh snowfall or ice storm. Just BE CAREFUL!


Local Neighborhood, February
Local Neighborhood, February

Some folks may even know how to get you onto private property where others cannot venture… BE SURE to get the owner’s written permission and their contact information prior to visiting.


3. Check local Parks and Recreation areas: many local Parks and Recreation areas have hiking trails and scenic overlooks that can be particularly beautiful in the winter. Look for parks with lakes, rivers, or mountains that can ride a stunning winter backdrop.


Breckenridge Park, January
Breckenridge Park, January

4. Wildlife Refuge: Visit any local or nearby wildlife refuges to potentially see a multitude of birds and other wildlife. Usually, entry is free, and you can stay as long as you like until sunset.


Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, November
Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, November

5. Visit botanical gardens: botanical gardens are often well maintained and can provide a peaceful and beautiful winter setting. Look for botanical gardens that have winter blooming flowers and Evergreen plants, as well as outdoor ice-skating rinks.



American Robin, Dallas Arboretum, January
American Robin, Dallas Arboretum, January

Leatherleaf Mahonia, Dallas Arboretum, January
Leatherleaf Mahonia, Dallas Arboretum, January

Camellia Bloom, Dallas Arboretum, January
Camellia Bloom, Dallas Arboretum, January

6. Explore nearby towns and cities: take a day trip to a nearby town or city and explore its parks, squares, and other public spaces. Look for places with holiday lights, winter festivals, and other seasonal events.


7. Travel: Invest and go on a trip to a fabulous wintery location for amazing views and scenes.



Lake Minnewanka, Banff, Alberta Canada, November
Lake Minnewanka, Banff, Alberta Canada, November

When taking photos in the winter, consider the lighting conditions and the type of camera you have. Try to shoot during the golden hour which is the hour after sunrise or before sunset when the light is soft and warm. A tripod can also be useful in low light conditions to help keep your camera steady. All-in-all, there are so many options to keep shooting in nature all throughout the year. You’re not bound to the warmer months.

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